Will I Be Able To See Clearly After The Initial Screening?

Mr Glenn Carp – “The initial screening is divided into two parts, which happen simultaneously, one after the other.  The first part is the true initial screening and that really ascertains the patient’s suitability for the actual treatment.  Following on from that and can be done directly after that we have what is called the ophthalmic examination and that is a slightly more in-depth look at the back of the eye, looking more to health of the eye.  At that portion of the visit dilating drops are put in the eyes.  These will enlarge the pupils, allowing us better vision and access to the back of the eye but indirectly can blur the vision slightly.  It also makes the vision a bit uncomfortable in bright sunlight but that of course can be helped with an ordinary pair of sunglasses.”

Initial Screening Explained Further…

Your vision will be unaffected after the initial screening. During the ophthalmic exam, we instill eye drops in your eyes to dilate your pupils so that we can run some of our tests. Patients are often light sensitive and blurry for up to 4 hours after we instill them. Hence, it is advisable to bring sunglasses to this appointment and to not plan any activities that require good vision for up to 4 hours after this appointment.


Mr Glenn Carp explains what happens during the initial screening.

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Fantastic not to be reliant on glasses for sending texts/reading menus/reading labels in supermarkets let alone for all reading and computer work. Dr Dan is a genius.– Shirley Drummond

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Will I Be Able To See Clearly After The Initial Screening? [Video]

One comment
  1. John Laser 22/12/2011 at 14:41

    The most common activity undertaken by patients with blurred vision straight after the opthalmic exam is, as I’m sure you are aware, driving.

    It’s such a fundamental part of how we move around, that people turn up for the opthalmic exam, I ask them how they got here, and they’re chatting away quite happily about their driving route for a good ten minutes+ before they twig what I’m really asking!

    Fortunately it’s always possible to work something out. 🙂

    Good article,
    John.

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