Robots Can’t Wear Reading Glasses

Each London Vision Clinic patient has his or her personal story regarding not being able to see properly and the nuisance of juggling glasses. However, being dressed from top to toe in a moulded metal outfit with just two tiny eye holes and then realising that you need reading glasses to see the cue cards, surely takes the biscuit.

This is what happened to Star Wars actor Anthony Daniels. As C-3PO, the endearing robot and loyal friend of Luke Skywalker, he found himself in the impossible position of not being able to see his script while wearing a costume that made it impossible to use reading glasses.

Like almost everyone of a certain age, Anthony was suffering from presbyopia – or ageing eyes – meaning that it becomes increasingly difficult to read or see clearly at near distance.

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Happily, like thousands of other patients, this actor had his sight problems corrected by Laser Blended Vision. Unlike its predecessor, monovision, blended vision leaves no gap between long and short-distance sight. This system was developed by Dr Dan in conjunction with Carl Zeiss Meditec in 2004.

“One of the advantages of inventing something is that you get to be the first one to use it”, said Dr Dan who has helped thousands of patients throw away their reading glasses.

Before Laser Blended Vision was introduced the only other option for getting rid of reading glasses would have been the less acceptable monovision laser surgery with its far from perfect intermediate vision quality; or intraocular lenses – either with monovision or multi focal lenses. Many patients have found it difficult to adapt to these lenses which give two images in each eye – the equivalent or wearing bi-focal or vari-focal glasses.

Dr Dan explains: “Obviously operating inside the eye (to insert intraocular lenses) is considerably more dangerous and carries higher risks than Laser Blended Vision. Also, there are still issues with the accuracy of the lenses and between 10 and 30% of all these patients need Laser Eye Surgery afterwards to adjust the difference.”

Please read more about Anthony Daniels’ experience as featured in the health pages of the Daily Mail October 18th 2011.

Contact a Patient Care Coordinator at 0207 224 1005 today to discuss Laser Eye Surgery or book your first consultation!

Robots Can’t Wear Reading Glasses